MALAYSIAN INVESTOR JUNKS OIL PALM PROJECT FOR RUBBER


MALAYSIAN INVESTOR JUNKS OIL PALM PROJECT FOR RUBBER

Originally posted on DURIANBURGDAVAO:

BY JOANNA C. BALANZA

A Malaysian investor eyeing a vast oil palm plantation in upland Marilog and Paquibato districts in Davao City has changed its plan.

Instead of oil palm it will be planting rubber, said Davao City Investment Promotions Center (DCIPC) officer Ivan Cortez.

Representatives of Felda Global Ventures (FGV) Holdings of Malaysia earlier visited potential sites in Marilog and Paquibato for a 100-hectare oil palm plantation.

 They found the terrain too steep for an oil palm venture, said Cortez to explain the shift to rubber.

The Malaysian investor said harvested oil palm fruits would be difficult to transport with Marilog and Paquibato having steep slopes, according to Cortez.

With the shift to another crop, Cortez said FGV would soon be sending its technical people to conduct a study on the proposed rubber project.

Mayor Rodrigo Duterte had strongly backed the oil palm project even as environmentalist groups said…

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IS INDUSTRIAL HEMP THE ULTIMATE ENERGY CROP?

Originally posted on THE INTERNET POST:

Is Industrial Hemp The Ultimate Energy Crop?

Bioenergy is currently the fastest growing source of renewable energy. Cultivating energy crops on arable land can decrease dependency on depleting fossil resources and it can mitigate climate change.

But some biofuel crops have bad environmental effects: they use too much water, displace people and create more emissions than they save. This has led to a demand for high-yielding energy crops with low environmental impact. Industrial hemp is said to be just that.

Enthusiasts have been promoting the use of industrial hemp for producing bioenergy for a long time now. With its potentially high biomass yield and its suitability to fit into existing crop rotations, hemp could not only complement but exceed other available energy crops.

Hemp, Cannabis sativa, originates from western Asia and India and from there spread around the globe. For centuries, fibres were used to make ropes, sails…

View original 555 more words

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